Mayor Garcetti’s Great Streets Initiative

After 100 days in office, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti announced his first executive directive – the Great Streets Initiative. As Marie Sullivan at Metro’s The Source writes, “It was during this speech that I realized, the Mayor is a straight-up Planner!” Indeed, a mayor whose first major announcement mentions Red Cars, bioswales, and WalkScore has me optimistic.

Garcetti asserts, “Design matters…We have ignored the aesthetics of our city too often. But the way a neighborhood looks and feels has a lot to do with its livability and vibrancy.” Aesthetically pleasing street furniture is a good step, and I hope this initiative can help strengthen connected public health, green space, and transit corridor projects.

Irvine Shooting

Police Cruiser

Police Cruiser

Irvine Police were involved in a hostage situation with a  man who shot and killed someone 400 feet from my house today.  That’s the second shooting death in Irvine this year.  Is this the start of Irvine’s transition from suburb to slum?

ACC Tower Rendering

The American Commerce Center Tower, which will soar above the recently completed Comcast Center in Center City, Philadelphia, passed its last zoning test last week.  When completed, the skyscraper will be the third tallest building in the United States.  It’s great that the developer is stressing SEPTA and AMTRAK accessibility and seeking LEED Gold Certification.  If construction goes as scheduled, the tower should be completed in 2012, the same year as the Cira Center South project.  It’s exciting that Philadelphia is becoming quite a hub of architecture.

Palin Fights Against Environmental Justice in California

The LA Times reported last week that Governor Palin has been working against California SB 974, which would implement per-container charges to fund air quality and goods movement measures in the Los Angeles and Bay areas.  I think it’s a pretty base move (though not that surprising) for the Governor of Alaska to seek to dissuade Californian officials from addressing some of Southern California’s most crippling problems.  The pollution, health, and safety problems caused by the ports is a case of environmental injustice.

The LA Times notes that:

Fully 15% of the nation’s international container trade travels along the 710 en route to rail yards east of Los Angeles, warehouses in the Inland Empire and importers nationwide.

Environmental justice communities near the ports and along freeway corridors should not have to bear the unmitigated harms of the nation’s cargo needs.

Today’s strategies of goods movement in Southern California, especially through the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, are dangerous and inefficient.  Traffic congestion on local freeways, particularly the 5, 10, 15, 60, and 710 is significantly worsened by truck traffic from the ports.  Truck traffic from the ports creates safety hazards for drivers; an example is a seven vehicle fatal crash on the 710 last year.  As shown by last week’s train crash, Southern California railroads may also need to consider better and safer ways to move rail cargo on tracks that are increasingly being used for heavy commuter rail traffic.  Additionally, the pollution emanating from the ports leads to disproportionate health problems in lower income communities of color; the Times article above explains that literally thousands of Californians die each year as a result of pollutant emissions from the ports.

The bill (full text available here) recognizes that:

(b) The operation of the ports and trains, ships, and trucks that move cargo containers to and from the ports cause air pollution that requires mitigation.
(c) The improvement of goods movement infrastructure would benefit the owners of container cargo moving through the ports by allowing the owners of the cargo to move container cargo more efficiently and reliably, and to move more cargo through those ports.
(d) It is vital to the movement of goods in California, especially
in southern California, to resolve the road and rail conflicts of locomotives carrying container cargo and automobile traffic by
building grade separations. This infrastructure will reduce air
pollution and provide benefits to the owners of container cargo by
mitigating rail expansion. Without these grade separations, the rail
expansion may not happen, and California could lose valuable goods movement jobs.
(e) The reduction of goods movement air pollution would benefit
the owners of container cargo moving through the ports by contributing to the achievement or maintenance of federal air quality standards, which will allow for continued federal funding of goods movement infrastructure projects.
(f) The Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach and the Port of Oakland operate in unique communities, environments, and markets that require infrastructure improvements and air pollution reduction measures tailored to the nature and degree of need in each port of each community.

Governor Palin’s argument against the bill completely disregards the public health, environmental justice, traffic congestion, safety, and environmental concerns of California.

It Wasn’t Me

Even though I was still in Southern California when this bus was stolen, I promise I had nothing to do with it.