People’s Climate March: 6 Weeks Later

In September, I joined 400,000 others in New York for the People’s Climate March. It was a joyous convocation of people of color, people of faith, old people, and young people, all demanding action to address climate change and expressing shared hope for a just transition.

A month and a half later, I’m trying to reconcile the march’s magnitude and passion for action with what the US midterm election results mean, especially for the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee. The probable new chair of that committee, which oversees the Environmental Protection Agency, has compared the EPA to the Gestapo and authored a book entitled “The Greatest Hoax: How the Global Warming Conspiracy Threatens Your Future.”

The hundreds of thousands who marched in New York, and the millions around the world whom they marched to represent, see clearly that the conspiracy threatening their future is not a hoax, but politicians representing corporate money.

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Flooding in Nicaragua

During my stay, Nicaragua’s two largest lakes reached record heights, surpassing the floods resulting from Hurricane Mitch in 1998. Cocibolca (The Lake of Nicaragua) inundated one town that is not expected to be recoverable for three years. Xolotlan (The Lake of Managua) flooded Tipitapa and many of the communities around its shores. Local news channels showed footage of the flooding and scenes from refugee centers almost every night. President Ortega’s approval ratings have increased during the flooding; the government’s response is well-regarded, as are the additional refugee-center jobs being created (largely for Sandinista party members). While acknowledging factors contributing to these record floods, such as unauthorized low-lying settlements and an antiquated storm drain system, the Nicaraguan president’s jury is not out on for the fundamental cause: world capitalism (and the climate change it causes).

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Flying

The Commodore Barry Bridge and Southeastern Pennsylvania after a morning takeoff from PHL

The Commodore Barry Bridge and Southeastern Pennsylvania after a morning takeoff from PHL

This weekend will be sandwiched in between two trips to the West Coast.  I was home last weekend and will be in Las Vegas next weekend.  While I’ve enjoyed some pretty aerial views, that’s way too much flying.  I’m on track to have made 21 takeoffs and landings in 2008.  Can anyone say carbon footprint?