FIDAE – South American Airshow

Pictures from FIDAE 2014, an international air show in Santiago. Highlights included seeing a A-380 flying and maneuvering low, watching people pose with the Air Force pilots from Gringolandia, and chatting up private pilots from Chile and Argentina.

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Night Flying

Santiago Timelapse

Above is a timelapse compilation of Santiago I put together from my last trip there.

It doesn’t reach the aesthetic quality of one of my favorite parts of (the otherwise rather crass) movie, Que Pena tu Vida, below. But maybe it still gets across a small glimpse of Santiago’s beauty.
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Sunrise over the Andes

Three quick stop-motion sequences and a video from my arrival into Santiago one month ago:

September 11, Santiago, Sarin, and Syria

Generated by Facebook Photo Fetcher 2

What kind of world will we live in if the United States of America sees a dictator brazenly violate international law with poison gas, and we choose to look the other way? – President Obama

If only this rhetorical question were truly a contrafactual. In fact, not only do we know a world in which the US government looks the other way from dictators using chemical weapons, we live in a world shaped partly by the US government’s long history of actively supporting such dictators. For President Obama to make some of these claims about the exceptional moral authority of the United States on the eve of the 40th anniversary of the coup against President Allende in Chile struck me as especially hypocritical.

More thoughts on President Obama’s take on Syria from an article entitled “Hypocrite in Chief:”

Of the numberless hypocrisies of the administration, this one is particularly crude. The White House claims to need to punish Syria’s Bashar al-Assad regime for the unproven use of chemical weapons (sarin) in Ghouta. Not only does this atrocity, committed by unidentified actors in a civil, ethnic, sectarian, and proxy conflict within Syria, somehow make Syria a national security threat to the United States, but it also suggests we deplore the use of chemical weapons. Neither is remotely true.

During the Pinochet Dictatorship in Chile, paid CIA contacts and graduates of the School of the Americas led DINA, the Chilean National Intelligence Directorate notorious for kidnapping and torture. In my trips to Chile, I have visited a number of the secret detention centers where DINA tortured and killed thousands during the dictatorship. In addition to perpetrating gruesome acts of torture, DINA agents also oversaw the manufacture and use of sarin, botulism, and other chemical agents.
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